The Best of Vice: Not Nearly Enough Nudity

The Best of Vice: Not Nearly Enough Nudity

News, Nudity, and Nonsense


Vice: News, Nudity, & Nonsense, The Best of Vice Magazine, Vol. II 2003-2008

 

I picked up this Vice collection at an erotic book store in Portland; I was enticed by the thought of copious amounts of nudity and tell-all tales about the lives of sluts and those in the porn industry. I was disappointed on the first count—there really isn’t all that much nudity in the book—but not by the second. The Best of Vice Magazine has no shortage of scintillating behind-the scenes stories about sex (and drugs) from experts in the field, as well as sections on literature.

Vice has an entire chapter devoted solely to sex, my favorite subject. The articles range from an expose on prostitution—the gist of that particular article is that prostitution is more about the coke and less about the glam and empowerment—and an article about a 74-year-old Japanese porn star who has appeared in more than 250 XXX films despite his advanced age. Vice’s chapter on sex also contains little interviews from “Couples who have just had sex” and an expose from a woman fucking and comparing three officers of the law. (The “Couples who have just had sex” interviews are the least compelling part of the chapter—everything else is much more fun.)

None of the photographs in the book are particularly graphic—the notable exception is not an erotic image at all, but instead a disturbing shot of a man biting a kitten’s head. The photographs in the book are not great quality and have the gritty appearance of a black and white newspaper, so I wouldn’t necessarily recommend the book for anyone collecting erotic art. (There is, however, a small section in Vice containing drawings.)

Aside from the sex chapter which I expect most would mark as a favorite, Vice’s section on drugs is also outstanding. Vice’s drug chapter includes articles about coke, heroin, and one article detailing personal experiences with a large array of chemical hallucinogenic drugs.

The Montreal-based magazine is online now for the digital age and appears to have a  partnership from Intel; the visuals and graphics are much more compelling on the site than the copy of the book I have—the written words in the book are definitely its charm—and will definitely be a new destination for my Internet surfing.

The Best of Vice Magazine isn’t a coffee table book despite its cool cover; if you don’t like to read, you’re probably not going to enjoy it.